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    Queen death news: And latest King Charles III updates | Daily Mail Online

    Follow MailOnline’s liveblog for updates today after Her Majesty The Queen died aged 96 at Balmoral yesterday, and the nation begins a period of mourning:

    Queen seemed frail but in ‘really good spirits’ at the weekend

    The Queen seemed frail but in ‘really good spirits’ when he met her at the weekend, the Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland has said.

    The Rt Rev Dr Iain Greenshields spent the weekend at Balmoral and had dinner with the Queen on Saturday and lunch with her on Sunday.

    He described the monarch as ‘fabulous’ and ‘very engaging’ company, and said their conversation ranged over a wide array of topics.

    And he said he was surprised by the sudden decline in her health and death yesterday.

    Recalling his time with the Queen at the weekend, Dr Greenshields told BBC Radio Scotland’s Good Morning Scotland programme: ‘She was in great form, really good spirits – obviously frail, you can see that, but absolutely on the ball.

    ‘She was talking about her past, her love for Balmoral, her father, her mother, Prince Philip, horses, very much very engaged with what was happening in the church and what was happening in the nation too.

    ‘This frail lady came in but there was still that sense of who she was and that real sense of making you feel immediately at ease, engaging with you immediately in conversation, a nice bright smile, everything you would expect of your monarch.’

    09:28
    What will happen today after the Queen’s death?

    The King and Queen to return to London – Charles and Camilla stayed at Balmoral overnight last night, but return to London tomorrow.

    12pm – Church bells expected to ring across the country in commemoration of the Queen.

    12pm – Tributes to the Queen will be paid by MPs in the House of Commons, led by Prime Minister Liz Truss and Speaker of the House Lindsay Hoyle.

    1pm: Gun salutes – one round for every year of the Queen’s life – will be fired in London’s Hyde Park and at other stations.

    Audience with the PM – despite his grief, duty calls for new sovereign Charles who will have his first audience as monarch with Prime Minister Liz Truss this afternoon.

    Confirming funeral plans – Charles is likely to meet the Earl Marshal – the Duke of Norfolk – who is in charge of the accession and the Queen’s funeral, to approve the carefully choreographed schedule for the coming days.

    Court mourning – A period of royal mourning for members of the royal family and royal households will be observed until seven days after the Queen’s funeral, the date of which is to be confirmed by Buckingham Palace.

    National mourning – The Government will confirm the length of national mourning, which is likely to be around 12 days, from now up to the day after the Queen’s funeral. They will also announce that the funeral day will be a public holiday in the form of a Day of National Mourning.

    6pm – The King will make a televised address to the nation, which he is due to pre-record. He will pay tribute to the Queen and pledge his duty to his service as the new sovereign.

    6pm – Service at St Paul’s Cathedral – The Prime Minister and senior ministers will attend a public service of remembrance at St Paul’s in central London.

    09:24
    How you can attend remembrance service at St Paul’s at 6pm today

    The Prime Minister and senior ministers will attend a public Service of Prayer and Reflection on the death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at St Paul’s in London at 6pm today.

    The public have been invited to attend and 2,000 seats will be allocated on a first come first served basis.

    They will be available at the City of London tourism office.

    09:20
    What time will King Charles III’s televised speech be shown?

    King Charles III will make a televised address to the nation, which he is due to pre-record, in the early evening.

    He will pay tribute to the Queen and pledge his duty to his service as the new sovereign.

    An exact time has not yet been confirmed, but it is expected to be around 6pm.

    09:17
    What will happen to flowers left outside Buckingham Palace?

    Those who wish to leave floral tributes at Buckingham Palace will be guided to lay them at dedicated sites in Green Park or Hyde Park, the Palace said.

    Flowers left outside the Palace gates will be moved to the Green Park Floral Tribute Garden by The Royal Parks.

    At Windsor Castle, floral tributes can be left at Cambridge Gate on the Long Walk. These flowers will be brought inside the castle each evening and placed on the castle chapter grass on the south side of St George’s Chapel and Cambridge Drive.

    At the Sandringham Estate, people are encouraged to leave floral tributes at the Norwich Gates.

    At Balmoral Castle, floral tributes can be left at the main gate.

    At the Palace of Holyroodhouse, people are encouraged to give floral tributes to the wardens at the entrance to The Queen’s Gallery. Those flowers will be laid on the forecourt grass in front of the Palace’s north turret.

    At Hillsborough Castle, floral tributes may be laid on the castle forecourt in front of the main gates.

    09:16
    How long will the royal residences close for after Queen’s death?

    Buckingham Palace said royal residences will close until after the Queen’s funeral, including the Queen’s Gallery and the Royal Mews at Buckingham Palace, as well as the Queen’s Gallery in Edinburgh.

    Balmoral Castle and Sandringham House, the Queen’s private estates, will also close for this period, as will Hillsborough Castle, the sovereign’s official residence in Northern Ireland.

    09:15
    Who will observe the period of Royal Mourning?

    Royal Mourning will be observed by members of the royal family, royal household staff and representatives of the royal household on official duties, together with troops committed to ceremonial duties, Buckingham Palace said.

    09:14
    Queen’s ‘enchanting’ appearance with Paddington Bear

    Broadcaster and author Gyles Brandreth said the Queen ‘wouldn’t have minded’ being an actress and described her appearance with Paddington Bear as ‘enchanting’.

    He told BBC Breakfast: ‘She was a different person for different generations, but my Goodness didn’t she do well to keep in touch? She could actually do a fist bump, she didn’t like mobile phones at the dining table, but she did know how to use one.

    ‘To see her with Paddington Bear, just this last summer, only a few months ago, was a complete enchantment. I think that she wouldn’t have minded being an actress.

    ‘I once had a conversation with her about Windsor Castle. She talked about the war and when she appeared in Christmas pantomimes, and said she’d rather enjoyed being principal boy.

    ‘I said, ‘Would you like to be an actress?’ ‘Well, maybe’. We could see the end of her life. What a brilliant actress she would have been.’

    09:13
    How can you pay tribute to the Queen?

    There will be no physical books of condolence at the royal residences. An online book of condolence is available on the royal website.

    09:11
    Queen had particular admiration for Nelson Mandela, says Gyles Brandreth

    Gyles Brandreth, broadcaster and author and friend of the Duke of Edinburgh, said the Queen ‘never expressed admiration’ for world leaders but had particular admiration for Nelson Mandela.

    ‘At age 96, she met 15 British prime ministers, when you remember that first prime minister was Winston Churchill, who was born in 1874, the most recent Prime Minister, Liz Truss, was born in 1975 – a span of 100 years.

    ‘She delivered one-to-one with all the world’s leaders that she met as the ambassador for the United Kingdom as the head of the Commonwealth – somebody who knew everybody who literally had met every world leader… every United States president from president Truman onwards.

    ‘She never expressed particular admiration for people even if you tried to test her, though I think she had a particular respect for Nelson Mandela because, as she said, he admired what he did in prison and emerged without rancour.

    ‘She was a person who had no rancour. She was gracious. She was good. She was an example to us all. She was the best of us. And I think that brought out the best in us.’

    09:09
    Royal mourning will be observed until seven days after the Queen’s funeral

    A period of royal mourning will be observed from now until seven days after the Queen’s funeral, the date of which will be confirmed in due course, Buckingham Palace said today.

    09:07
    Gyles Brandreth remembers the Queen’s ‘wry sense of humour’

    Gyles Brandreth, a broadcaster and author who was friends with The Duke of Edinburgh, described the Queen’s ‘wry sense of humour’ and ‘electric smile’.

    He told BBC Breakfast: ‘She was extraordinary and it wasn’t simply because she was the Queen, I think it was the nature of her personality. That smile was electric.

    ‘As the Queen grew older, she was conscious that her face sometimes looked a little bit grumpy unless she was smiling so she did flash that smile, but it was unbelievable. It really could light up a room.

    ‘You saw it in that picture taken only on Tuesday, looking rather impish, clearly an elderly frail person, and yet with a twinkle in her eye. She had a wry sense of humour.

    ‘I think the only thing that wasn’t on public display as much as it might have been over the years was her great sense of humour – never malicious that it was worldly wise.’

    09:03
    BBC One continues to suspend regular programming

    BBC One has suspended its regular programming schedule in the wake of the Queen’s death.

    The broadcaster is airing rolling news coverage today with a BBC News Special filling regular TV slots in between BBC News at One and BBC News at Six.

    Programmes including EastEnders, Homes Under The Hammer, Bargain Hunt, and Doctors have moved from their usual channel and will air on BBC Two throughout the day.

    Similarly, the new BBC Two programming schedule includes the additions of Animal Park, Best Bakes Ever, Money For Nothing, Garden Rescue and The Bidding Room.

    Alexander Armstrong’s quiz show Pointless will also appear on the BBC Two schedule at 5.15pm before Garden Rescue, which also moved channels today.

    Yesterday, BBC One interrupted Bargain Hunt at 12.39pm to deliver the statement from Buckingham Palace which said royal doctors were concerned for health.

    09:00
    Australian tourist felt like she had ‘walked into history’

    Christine Ashley, 68, from Canberra in Australia, said she landed in the UK for a holiday with her husband Norman Ashley, 71, on Thursday – the day the Queen died – and felt like she had ‘walked into history’.

    Speaking outside Buckingham Palace, Mrs Ashley, a dual British-Australian national, said: ‘It’s very sad, very, very sad. Like everyone’s been saying, she’s been part of our lives.’

    Mrs Ashley added: ‘I’m a dual citizen, I grew up in the UK, and it’s a time of uncertainty and the Queen was one of those stabilising factors around the world in these troubling times. So I guess there’s a sense of dread about what the future holds.’

    08:57
    Bishop of Leicester says the Queen taught him how to play cards

    The Bishop of Leicester, Martyn Snow, described a fond memory of the Queen teaching him how to play cards.

    ‘I was also invited for a weekend at Sandringham with the Queen and Prince Philip, an extraordinary weekend in all sorts of different ways,’ he said.

    ‘My memory of it, in particular playing cards with the Queen which was quite extraordinary.

    ‘So she taught me how to play patience – a very particular form of patience that she often played when there were lots of guests around I think – and when I admitted that I didn’t know how to play it, she taught me, so that’s a memory that will live with me long.’

    Prince Harry has today left Balmoral after 12 hours mourning the Queen with his father, King Charles III, and brother Prince William .

    The Duke of Sussex is expected to be heading back to Windsor to be with Meghan Markle after losing a race against time to get to his beloved grandmother’s bedside before she died yesterday.

    Read the full story on MailOnline here:

    Theresa May recalls audiences with the ‘immensely knowledgeable’ Queen

    Former prime minister Theresa May said audiences with the ‘immensely knowledgeable’ Queen were the only meetings as leader where everything that was said would remain private.

    She told the BBC Radio 4 Today programme that the meetings involved ‘talking about the affairs of the day, in a sense tapping into her wisdom and that knowledge that she had from her great experience’.

    Mrs May told the broadcaster the Queen would pass on ‘the knowledge that she had of the people, a lot of the people that the prime minister, that I, was dealing with.’

    She added: ‘She was a very acute judge of people and was able often to give those little, if you like, pen portraits of people that she knew, that she’d met.

    ‘And sometimes it was a case of not just the individual but actually a sort of history of that individual, of her experiences of particular countries, particular issues.’

    Paying tribute to the Queen’s warm nature, Mrs May said: ‘There was often that twinkle in the eye, and that magnificent smile that would break out and that calmed so many people’s nerves and made so many people feel at ease.’

    08:38
    Royal Commonwealth Society says the Queen offered a ‘personal touch’

    Dr Linda Yueh, executive chairwoman of the Royal Commonwealth Society, said the Queen offered a ‘personal touch’ to all those she met.

    The Queen was patron of the charity, which works to improve the lives of people living in Commonwealth countries.

    ‘She had an incredible smile that lit up the room,’ she told BBC Breakfast. ‘It doesn’t matter how many times you meet her, it’s always special.

    ‘I think I was always very struck by her interest and how involved she was in some of the projects that we delivered in her name.

    ‘And you just know the Queen would have had a question for you and listened intently to your answer. I think her personal touch, I think, is what most of us will be reflecting on.’

    08:15
    Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby says The Queen ‘never lost hope’

    The Queen ‘never lost hope’ even in bad moments in her life, the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said.

    He told BBC Breakfast: ‘The Queen constantly showed us the meaning of life – she was joyful, she was humorous, her life was full. But she never, even in bad moments, lost hope.

    ‘I obviously spoke to her after the death of the Duke of Edinburgh, and spent some time with her and there was just a solidity of hope in her life.’

    He added: ‘It feels as though for so many people around the world, especially in the UK, that a part of our lives we’ve taken for granted as being permanent is no longer there. And in that sense there is an enormous shift in the world around us, in how we see it and how we understand ourselves.

    ‘I think many people will be finding that sense of not just grief, but also uncertainty and to some extent a wondering about what is permanent.’

    08:11
    Winston Churchill ‘loved’ the Queen, says grandson Sir Nicholas Soames

    Sir Nicholas Soames said his grandfather Winston Churchill ‘loved’ the Queen.

    The former Tory minister told Times Radio: ‘I mean, that is the only word to use. It’s the only word that… can begin to cover his feelings for this young sovereign.

    ‘I think the Queen found him a great comfort. I think she must have been slightly alarmed to start with, but on the other hand, she’d known him since she was a little girl.

    ‘I mean, we’ve only lived in the shadow of one monarch. Churchill served six of the kings and queens of Britain. He was commissioned into the British Army in the reign of Queen Victoria and he died in the reign of Queen Elizabeth.’

    Churchill was the first of the Queen’s 15 prime ministers and greeted her on her sudden return to Britain from Kenya on the death of her father, King George VI in 1952.

    08:11
    Parliament to hear tributes to the Queen from MPs and peers

    Parliament will be brimming with memories of the Queen as MPs and peers gather to pay tributes in a special session of condolence.

    Both Houses are due to sit at 12pm to allow members to pay their respects, with normal politics on hold for a period of mourning.

    The tributes, led by Prime Minister Liz Truss, are due to last until 10pm tonight.

    There will also be a rare Saturday sitting, where senior MPs will take an oath of allegiance to the King from 2pm, with condolences continuing again until 10pm.

    08:10
    ‘Everybody got her attention’, says the Archbishop of Canterbury

    The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, said that the Queen could make anyone she met feel like they were the only person in the room.

    Praising the time she devoted to public service, he told BBC Breakfast: ‘There were hundreds of events every year which she attended.

    ‘And she was the one – and again it runs in the family, I’ve seen His Majesty do the same thing – who could go into a room full of people or walk down a crowded street, and everyone she spoke to felt that they were the only person there.

    ‘She was never looking over their shoulder to see if there was somebody a bit more interesting. Everybody got her attention.’

    He added: ‘I think part of her great service that was unseen, as one former prime minister I heard say, that there’s only one person in the world that he could talk to and say exactly what he thought and felt and was 100% certain that it would never go any further.

    ‘And I think that that was a hidden service. She was a place of confidences, and of accumulating wisdom.’

    08:06
    People gather at Buckingham Palace to pay tribute to the Queen

    Hundreds of people have gathered at Buckingham Palace gates to pay tribute to the Queen the day after her death.

    Mourners, many dressed all in black, congregated beside hundreds of colourful bouquets and messages which had been left overnight and early in the morning.

    A large Union flag in tones of black and grey has been pinned to the right flank of the gates, while police officers kept a crowd back from the main gates further to the left.

    08:05
    Winston Churchill’s grandson feels ‘desperate sadness’ at Queen’s death

    Sir Nicholas Soames, the former Conservative MP and grandson of Winston Churchill, said he feels ‘desperate sadness’ at the Queen’s death.

    He told Times Radio: ‘All, most of us, our generation, we have grown up with the Queen as our head of state.

    ‘And as the sort of absolute guarantor, in my view, of our stability – through hard times, through bad times, through thick and thin, the Queen was always there, wonderfully reassuring, calm, I think, sage figure, fortified and sustained, obviously by a profound faith.

    ‘So my feeling is one of desperate sadness. I really am so sad for her family, and I think it’s also worth remembering that the King has lost his father only quite recently, and now loses his mother. And for all the royal family, this is on every account, a very, very bad day indeed.’

    07:52
    London Stock Exchange will open today as trading continues

    The London Stock Exchange said it will open and trade as normal today following the Queen’s death.

    The Exchange confirmed trading will also ‘close at the normal times’ this afternoon.

    Trading will continue at the usual times during the national mourning, which is expected to continue for roughly 12 days.

    The Exchange did say, however, it will close if a public or bank holiday is announced for England and Wales.

    07:49
    Dalai Lama tells of his ‘deep sadness’ in letter to King Charles III

    The Dalai Lama has expressed his ‘deep sadness’ over the death of the Queen in a letter to King Charles III.

    ‘I remember seeing photographs of her coronation in magazines when I was young in Tibet,’ he told the King.

    ‘Her reign, as Britain’s longest-serving monarch, represented celebration, inspiration and a reassuring sense of continuity for so many people alive today.

    ‘Your mother lived a meaningful life with dignity, grace, a strong sense of service and a warm heart, qualities we all should treasure.’

    It is with deep sadness that I have learned this morning that Queen Elizabeth II, has passed away. I pray for her and offer heartfelt condolences to His Majesty Charles III, the Royal Family and the people of the United Kingdom. https://t.co/FgSoWtutcq

    — Dalai Lama (@DalaiLama)

    07:48
    What will happen today following The Queen’s death?

    The King and Queen return to London – Charles and Camilla stayed at Balmoral overnight last night, but will return to London today.

    Audience with the PM – Despite his grief, duty calls for new sovereign Charles who will have his first audience as monarch with Prime Minister Liz Truss.

    Confirming funeral plans – Charles is likely to meet the Earl Marshal – the Duke of Norfolk – who is in charge of the accession and the Queen’s funeral, to approve the carefully choreographed schedule for the coming days.

    Court mourning – Charles will decide on the length of court or royal mourning for members of the royal family and royal households. It is expected to last a month.

    National mourning – The Government will confirm the length of national mourning, which is likely to be around 12 days, from now up to the day after the Queen’s funeral.

    Flags – Union flags on royal buildings are flying at half-mast.

    Bells and gun salutes – Bells will toll at Westminster Abbey, St Paul’s Cathedral and Windsor Castle.

    Gun salutes – One round for every year of the Queen’s life – will be fired in Hyde Park and at other stations.

    Charles’s televised address – The King will make a televised address to the nation, which he is due to pre-record, in the early evening.

    Service at St Paul’s Cathedral – The Prime Minister and senior ministers will attend a public service of remembrance at St Paul’s in London.

    07:45
    Charles to be formally proclaimed king at Accession Council tomorrow

    The new King will be formally proclaimed monarch at a historic Accession Council tomorrow.

    Charles has automatically become King on the death of his mother, but an Accession Council is usually convened at St James’s Palace in London within 24 hours of the death of a sovereign.

    It will be later following the death of the Queen because the announcement of her death did not come until early evening yesterday, meaning there was not enough time to set the plans in motion for this morning.

    07:44
    How did Buckingham Palace announce news of The Queen’s death?

    Buckingham Palace said in a statement at 6.30pm yesterday: ‘The Queen died peacefully at Balmoral this afternoon.

    ‘The King and The Queen Consort will remain at Balmoral this evening and will return to London tomorrow.’

    07:42
    Last Night of The Proms is cancelled by the BBC

    The BBC has announced that the Last Night Of The Proms has been cancelled as a mark of respect, following the death of the Queen.

    The conclusion of the eight-week summer season of daily orchestral classical music concerts, which takes place predominantly in the Royal Albert Hall in central London, was due to conclude on Saturday September 10.

    But following the historic news yesterday, the organisation announced that the final two nights of concerts today and tomorrow would no longer go ahead:

    Following the very sad news of the death of Her Majesty The Queen, as a mark of respect we will not be going ahead with Prom 71 on Friday 9 September, or the Last Night of the Proms on Saturday 10 September.

    — BBC Proms (@bbcproms)

    07:42
    Mourners gather at Buckingham Palace to pay tribute to The Queen

    People have gathered at the gates of Buckingham Palace, Balmoral and Windsor Castle to pay tribute to The Queen since her death was announced. Here is a video clip of some of the mourners in London today:

    07:39
    Royal website updated following The Queen’s death

    The official website of the royal family has been updated following the death of the Queen, with Charles now listed as His Majesty The King.

    Charles automatically succeeded his mother as the nation’s monarch upon her passing, but he will not be formally proclaimed King until an Accession Council is held at St James’s Palace in London tomorrow.

    However royal.uk already lists Charles as King, with his wife Camilla officially listed as Queen Consort.

    The website’s home page has also been updated with a list of feature articles dedicated to the Queen’s life and reign.

    07:38
    Mourners stand at Balmoral Castle’s gates after The Queen’s death

    Police are starting to let members of the public stand at the gates of Balmoral Castle to pay their respects to the Queen.

    Several people walked to the entrance of the grounds of the Scottish royal retreat from 6.30am today to lay bouquets of flowers as a tribute to the late monarch.

    One woman was spotted lighting a candle while others were seen reading personal notes written on the flowers.

    The area was blocked off for a period last night when members of the royal family arrived at the castle as news broke of the Queen dying.

    07:33
    How Britain’s newspapers have reacted to The Queen’s death

    The death of the Queen has sparked an outpouring of grief and tributes from the nation’s papers.

    The Times carries a striking image of the Queen at her coronation on June 2, 1953 – a picture which several papers deemed the perfect background to their tributes.

    The Guardian opts to let the Queen’s coronation image stand alone, bar some simple text on the left-hand side which reads: ‘Queen Elizabeth II 1926 – 2022’.

    And the Daily Mail mourns the Queen’s death with the headline: ‘Our hearts are broken.’

    07:31
    Welcome to MailOnline’s liveblog

    Good morning and welcome to MailOnline’s liveblog on this sombre day as the nation begins a period of mourning to mark the death of Her Majesty The Queen.

    Elizabeth II’s son and successor King Charles III spoke of his grief soon after Buckingham Palace announced the death of the 96-year-old monarch, who died ‘peacefully’ yesterday afternoon at Balmoral.

    Charles will now turn his mind to matters of state as he begins his first full day as the nation’s new monarch having spent much of his 73 years in preparation for the role.

    As tributes continue to flood in from around the globe, follow our liveblog today for updates.

    Queen death news: And latest King Charles III updates

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