More

    Brexiter Owen Paterson takes UK government to European court of human rights following lobbying scandal – live | Politics | The Guardian

    Owen Paterson takes government to European court of human rights saying lobbying probe breached his right to privacy

    Owen Paterson, the former Tory cabinet minister and arch Eurosceptic who resigned from parliament last year after an inquiry found he had broken the rules banning MPs from paid lobbying, is taking a case to European court of human rights.

    As the court explains in a summary of the case, Paterson “complains that his article 8 rights [to privacy] were infringed [by the inquiry process that led to his resignation], as the public finding that he had breached the code of conduct damaged his good reputation, and that the process by which the allegations against him were investigated and considered was not fair in many basic respects”.

    Joshua Rozenberg, the legal commentator, seems to have spotted the listing first.

    Owen Paterson, former MP and minister, has launched a case against the UK government at the European Court of Human Rights, complaining about the Commons process. The case has been “communicated” to the government by the court, giving the government an opportunity to respond. https://t.co/UleNxz6e88

    — Joshua Rozenberg (@JoshuaRozenberg)

    Like most Brexiters, Paterson has never been fond of the European court of human rights – although of course this court is not part of the EU.

    But, in the light of his decision to launch legal action, Paterson may be glad the government never followed the advice of the prominent Tory who gave a speech in 2014 saying the UK should break free of the European convention on human rights, on which the court adjudicates. That was Paterson himself.

    Paterson claims that the inquiry into the allegations against him was unfair because he did not get a proper right of appeal. MPs on the Commons standards committee did not accept that – they took evidence from Paterson after an inquiry from the parliamentary commissioner for standards found he broke the rules, and arguably that part of the process functions as an appeal – but Paterson was able to persuade Downing Street that he had a case, and Boris Johnson ordered Tory MPs to vote down the recommendation saying he should be suspended.

    The spectacle of Tory MPs voting to protect a colleague who broke the rules was disastrous for Johnson, who quickly realised he had made a huge mistake and ordered a U-turn. That prompted Paterson’s resignation, but the episode is seen as the start of the process that led to Johnson himself being forced to resign less than a year later.

    Owen Paterson, the former Tory cabinet minister and arch Eurosceptic who resigned from parliament last year after an inquiry found he had broken the rules banning MPs from paid lobbying, is taking a case to European court of human rights.

    As the court explains in a summary of the case, Paterson “complains that his article 8 rights [to privacy] were infringed [by the inquiry process that led to his resignation], as the public finding that he had breached the code of conduct damaged his good reputation, and that the process by which the allegations against him were investigated and considered was not fair in many basic respects”.

    Joshua Rozenberg, the legal commentator, seems to have spotted the listing first.

    Owen Paterson, former MP and minister, has launched a case against the UK government at the European Court of Human Rights, complaining about the Commons process. The case has been “communicated” to the government by the court, giving the government an opportunity to respond. https://t.co/UleNxz6e88

    — Joshua Rozenberg (@JoshuaRozenberg)

    Like most Brexiters, Paterson has never been fond of the European court of human rights – although of course this court is not part of the EU.

    But, in the light of his decision to launch legal action, Paterson may be glad the government never followed the advice of the prominent Tory who gave a speech in 2014 saying the UK should break free of the European convention on human rights, on which the court adjudicates. That was Paterson himself.

    Paterson claims that the inquiry into the allegations against him was unfair because he did not get a proper right of appeal. MPs on the Commons standards committee did not accept that – they took evidence from Paterson after an inquiry from the parliamentary commissioner for standards found he broke the rules, and arguably that part of the process functions as an appeal – but Paterson was able to persuade Downing Street that he had a case, and Boris Johnson ordered Tory MPs to vote down the recommendation saying he should be suspended.

    The spectacle of Tory MPs voting to protect a colleague who broke the rules was disastrous for Johnson, who quickly realised he had made a huge mistake and ordered a U-turn. That prompted Paterson’s resignation, but the episode is seen as the start of the process that led to Johnson himself being forced to resign less than a year later.

    This content was originally published here.

    Latest articles

    spot_imgspot_img

    Related articles

    Leave a reply

    Please enter your comment!
    Please enter your name here

    spot_imgspot_img